Employee Recognition – Guiding Principles

formal-employee-recognition-culture[1]

Guiding Principles

A Simple ‘Thank You’
It only takes a moment (less than 60 seconds) to recognize the efforts of a co-worker. You could call it “fly-by appreciation”. Example: “Thanks for getting that study out to the staff so quickly. Now they will have time to read it before the meeting…”(15 sec.)
Pay Attention
Noticing when people are doing the right thing increases the probability they will repeat it. Example: “I saw how smoothly you let that student know what they could do to avoid a delay. Thanks for doing that level of customer service…”
Inspire Effort
People who feel appreciated give more to the job than what is merely required. They are ready to give the “discretionary effort” necessary to a healthy organization.
Reward the right things
You get what you pay attention to. If you positively comment on how an effort helps maintain our core values, or facilitates customer service, or helps new staff orient, or cross-trains staff, or builds teamwork, etc. staff will know what is important around here.
Personalized Approach
One size does not fit all. Staff are individuals and respond differently to the same strategy. Ask staff how they want to be recognized.
Equal Opportunity
There should be opportunity for all staff to receive recognition–whether for improving performance, for extra effort, for creativity, or for reliably doing their job each day.
Keep it Positive
To have the greatest impact, the recognition message needs to be completely positive (coach later!), specific, sincere, and given soon after the effort.
Enjoy!
“Fun, joy and sharing go hand-in glove with world class quality.”- Tom Peters. Celebrate individual and unit accomplishments- planned or spontaneously!
Recognize Leadership
Give recognition to staff that support a “recognition culture” with their actions and words by publicly noting their contribution, including it in their performance appraisal, inviting them to recognition celebrations, etc.
Recognize Teamwork
When the relationship among co-workers is good, recognition enhances work performance. When the relationship is troubled, it usually doesn’t matter how you reward or recognize people.

Source: Adapted from University of Iowa

Service Recognition Topics

http://www.washington.edu/admin/hr/roles/mgr/ee-recognition/guiding-principles.html


Harm prevention needs to look beyond the individual into the corporate and the systemic

Originally posted on SafetyAtWorkBlog:

Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) are excellent resources for minimising harm from workplace issues, particularly psychosocial hazards.  However this usually occurs after an event or an incident.  This reality was emphasised recently by a media release from AccessEAP that revealed “the top five causes of workplace stress” (not available online but an article based closely on the release is available HERE) .  The top 5 seems reasonable but the advice in the media release doesn’t seem to address the causes of the top 2 – Job Insecurity and Work Overload.  These are difficult hazards to address particularly as the causes may originate outside the workplace but the media release indicates that to be effective safety managers it is necessary to look beyond the company’s fenceline and accept that the prevention of harm is now just as much social and political as it is occupational.

The top 5 triggers of workplace…

View original 832 more words

12 Requirements for Powerful Empowerment | Leadership Freak

 

empowerment[1]

 

12 Requirements for Powerful Empowerment | Leadership Freak.

Managers!! Get out of the office

One of the best things that managers can do is get out of the office and get some face time going with the workers on the front line.  Get out and interact with them. Not in an event way like “ride the big bike” for charity event once a year. I mean get out there as individuals and create friendships with the employees.  Too many times there is a distinct separation between management and hourly employees, which causes a distancing effect from your workforce that can undermine your corporate goals as a whole.

When a regular hourly employee knows your name and you give genuine recognition, then you have an employee who feels like you care about them and they will stop at nothing to do the best job they can to aid and assist in the success of the corporate goals.

Employee Wellness, Morale, and the Bottom Line

Originally posted on kirenlakhani:

images

Keeping your employees happy is a key component to getting the most out of your bottom line.  With a business being ran by a bunch of unhappy campers who don’t want to be there, you can bet that your production rates will decrease as well.  Not every job is glamorous.  As a matter of fact, most jobs are the complete opposite.  However, that does not warrant the assumption that every day has to be a living hell.  Understanding the connection between employee wellness, morale, and the bottom line will help any frustrated supervisor transform their workforce.

Tracking Employee Wellness

Your employees are simply human beings who are trying to make a living.  They do not need or wish to be treated as slaves – machines that can take a beating without uttering a complaint.  Even machines break down; and your employees will as well if you don’t take some time…

View original 362 more words

4 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Hiring An Employee

Originally posted on ArtRainer.com:

Agreement

I have hired or been a part of hiring several employees. Some have turned out to be great employees while others were not. Over the years, I hope that I have become better at identifying those employees who will be great through continued education and learning from my successes and failures.

I have learned that great employees are capable, hard-working team players you can trust. Before I place an offer on the table to a prospective employee, I try to have four questions on trust answered. Here are four questions to ask yourself before hiring an employee:

1. Can I trust them to do the job well?

Some employees are able to jump into a new position and immediately excel. Others need some ramp up time to learn the nuances of the role. I am fine with either. Like Jim Collins, I believe that it is simply important to get…

View original 345 more words

Stress In The Workplace

 

Studies have shown that for every dollar spent on controlling psychosocial hazards, you can save between three to six dollars on your bottom line!

We can learn many things about stress management and how stress management can benefit workplaces. For example, dairy farmers are drastically changing the way in which cows are raised. Dairy farmers have found that creating a relaxing, non-stressful environment for the cows turns into better profits.  Cows no longer are cooped up in small stalls, or separated from their young; instead they roam freely in pastures.  Come milking time, the cows go in a modern, high-tech barn that is designed for maximum comfort. The floors are made of stainless steel, that’s so that the robotic squeegee can scrape all waste matter away to prevent disease. The cows also have access to large “car-wash type” brushes that automatically spin when a cow is present, this is to help the cow get at those irritating itches. Milking the cow is accomplished by a laser guided machine that finds each nipple, all without any person touching the cow.  Once hooked up, the machine monitors the milk for any temperature changes or disease. To further reduce stress the cow is always with their young, even when it’s time for milking.

Dairy farmers say that a happy cow gives more milk, and that the milk is better quality. They are witnessing positive results from their investment in stress management.

How can we apply stress management to everyday workers? We need to first realize that stressed workers are less productive, more prone to accidents, have more sick days, and cost the company many thousands of dollars on the bottom line.

The solution to these problems can come through a good stress management program where employees feel good about coming to work and doing the best job they can. Creating this friendly, non-confrontational atmosphere can be attained through: commitment, desire, and proper leadership. The monetary cost of stress management can be minimal when you understand your psychosocial hazards that exist in your workplace, and you control them.

Over the past twenty years of health and safety management, there has been much study on the term Psychosocial hazard, and, if it really exists in our workplaces.  The Ministry of Labor, W.S.I.B., Health and Safety Professionals, C.S.A and Union Leaders all recognize that psychosocial hazards are real, and that they can be controlled just as much as physical hazards.

Holy Cow!

Young Drivers Of Canada

Image

So it’s my birthday today and I got thinking about my driver training I received when I turned 16.

  • Look ahead
  • Look where you want to go
  • Shoulder check and mirror check
  • Drive, according to the weather conditions
  • Anticipate problems and have room to react

Still no accidents and I can attribute this to my excellent driver training.

We can apply this same train of thought to successful businesses and how to avoid pitfalls or failure. Look ahead, anticipate problems and deal with them before they become problems.

Evaluate your business, look ahead, where do you want to go?

Morale


Morale, also known as esprit de corps when discussing the morale of a group, is an intangible term used to describe the capacity of  people to maintain belief in an institution or a goal.

Right from the start of every military career, esprit de corps is taught to young recruits as an essential part of being in the military.  It is the “Glue” that keeps a unit together, ready for whatever challenge may arise.

Being posted to a warship I know how true this really is, for example, when a ship has a high morale  thing are good; the food is great, everybody is rested and feeling energized.. smiles.. jokes and high fives all around.  Nothing can stop us!

On the flip side, when the morale is low it can be like a jail with no escape.  People are upset, frustrated and even emotionally damaged.  You just don’t want to be there anymore, but you don’t really have a choice because you can’t just get off a ship in the middle of the ocean.

Interestingly enough, the Captain of the ship and how he treats the crew, is the sole reason for good or bad morale.

One With The Strength Of Many

Psychosocial Hazard?

 

  When we think of hazards at work, we generally think of physical hazards like: pinch points, nip points, trip hazards and guarding issues.

Psychosocial hazards are just as real as physical hazards at work, and in some cases, if not recognized and controlled they can have a very negative impact on your bottom line.

Many studies have been done on psychosocial hazards, and the impact on the workplace. Dr. Martin Shain and Health Canada have put out a recent study called Best Advice on Risk Management in the Workplace. It simply states that workers with a high demand for production and little or no control, and, or, high effort/low reward are at risk of being frustrated, angry, and stressed, which can contribute to aggressive behavior, sabotage, poor physical and mental health and a general lack of safety. These negative feelings can be multiplied two to three times if the employee perceives the employer as being unfair.

We can come up with many situations that exemplify this research, such as the example of a good marriage. When you ask two people who have been married for a long time “what helped them stay together”; they always say the same thing… “it is a relationship of give and take” which means the effort/reward system is good. On the other hand, ask a divorced couple to highlight the reasons why they got divorced and the answer is mostly…”I gave so much and got nothing in return”, Which means the effort/reward system has failed and so has their relationship.

Oddly enough, the marriage scenario is most like our workplaces. The relationship between employer/employee both have basic needs that have to be met to feel good about the working relationship.

Recognizing that psychosocial hazards exist is the first step in a process set up to control them, and controlling them can put you in Canada’s top 100 employers list where the effort/reward system is working; and it is the main reason why they are considered Top Employers!

How to Keep Workers Happy [Infographic]

happy-employees-infographic[1]

How to Keep Workers Happy [Infographic].

“The Right to Refuse”

Picture+1[1]

We here in Canada have some great laws that protect the worker’s safety, however,  they’re widely unknown and unused.

The most unused law is the right to refuse unsafe work.  It’s probably the most powerful and important “right” workers have, yet it goes unused.  Just think of all the deaths and accidents that could have been prevented if they had used that right.

Every person I hire starts their fist day with me.  We go through training videos, have a safety tour of the plant at which time I show them all the does and don’t s and what to watch for.  I also explain in detail the right to refuse unsafe work and I encourage them to use it.  By doing this I give them the knowledge and tools to stay safe and go home at the end of each shift.

 

5 Ways CEOs Can Keep Employees Happy | CEO.com

john-mackey_credit-treehugger1[1]

5 Ways CEOs Can Keep Employees Happy | CEO.com.

5 tips for dealing with workplace anxiety

Originally posted on Ceridian - Transforming Human Capital Management:

employee stressMore than a few human resources leaders out there are worried about employee retention and productivity. There are many reasons why, but chief among them is anxiety among the workforce. If employees are feeling overworked, abused or otherwise emotionally distraught, it can affect them both professionally and personally. In many cases, it will lead to them seeking work elsewhere.

HR Morning recently publicized this growing concern. The news source publicized some alarming survey data that shows the effects of workplace anxiety – in a recent Right Management poll, 83 percent of employees said they would be “looking to make a move” in 2014, and another 9 percent are busy networking because they’re “considering” finding something new. Of the 900-plus workers polled, only 5 percent were confident they would stay in their current positions.

View original 376 more words

Motivational Quote George S. Patton

Originally posted on The Daily Go-Getter:

20140203-161234.jpg

Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity. – George S. Patton

View original

Forbes Says Happy Employees = Hefty Profits

http://www.forbes.com/sites/meghanbiro/2014/01/19/happy-employees-hefty-profits/.

Finding Sanity in an Insanely Busy World

Is it possible to achieve a high-five slapping, relaxed, stress free work environment?

happy26rb1[1]

    

We’ve all worked in places where we had stress from high demands, low reward, unreasonable expectations, gossip and even political games that can get pretty nasty!

Some of us have had the privilege of working in an almost utopia of positive reinforcement by senior staff combined with a genuine caring for your over all well-being.  Everyone is made to feel welcome and part of a team. It’s relaxed, stress free and you may even get excited about going to work to do the best job you can!

I am a fan of the T.V. series Undercover Boss, mostly because it’s shed a light on the subject of psychosocial aspects in the workplace.  I like how the “boss” connects with the regular workers and listens to their concerns.  The “boss” always addresses the concerns and even finds a way to reward peoples loyalty and dedication with great gifts.

So  is it possible to achieve a happy, stress free workplace?  YES, only if the boss is behind it 100%.  Without that clear support from the top it wont have legs and eventually it will fade away.

 

If you build it, they will come!

Workplace Psychology?

<div style=”margin-bottom:5px”> <strong> <a href=”https://www.slideshare.net/CCOHS/mental-health-intheworkplacewsps26sept13federalopenhouseasticou&#8221; title=”Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace ” target=”_blank”>Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace </a> </strong> from <strong><a href=”http://www.slideshare.net/CCOHS&#8221; target=”_blank”>CCOHS</a></strong> </div>

Heat Stress

Image

When workers are hot and sweaty they need plenty of water to hydrate themselves to prevent heat stroke.  In the military Commanders give orders for personnel to drink water when it is hot, and believe me, you have to drink the whole bottle.

I have taken this one step further by handing out freezes or ice cream to workers when it is very hot.  I am amazed at the reaction I get each time.  Most of the time I am greeted by a very big smile with many thanks with much appreciation.

Something as simple as a Mr. Freeze or ice cream can give your workers  confidence that you really care about their psychosocial state, which is a very inexpensive investment on your bottom line  gains.

Make it fun, wear a bell or a goofy had and watch the results of a simple approach to heat stress!

Testing for Psychosocial Health

If you are interested in exploring the positive benefits of psychosocial health and how to vastly improve your work environment, this video is for you!

What Do You Want To Do?

I often watch TED talks and found this one very interesting, not because the speaker has the same name as me, but the passion he has for teaching and the way he gives control of the class to his students with amazing results each year!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 144 other followers