Monthly Archives: February 2014

Young Drivers Of Canada

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So it’s my birthday today and I got thinking about my driver training I received when I turned 16.

  • Look ahead
  • Look where you want to go
  • Shoulder check and mirror check
  • Drive, according to the weather conditions
  • Anticipate problems and have room to react

Still no accidents and I can attribute this to my excellent driver training.

We can apply this same train of thought to successful businesses and how to avoid pitfalls or failure. Look ahead, anticipate problems and deal with them before they become problems.

Evaluate your business, look ahead, where do you want to go?

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Morale


Morale, also known as esprit de corps when discussing the morale of a group, is an intangible term used to describe the capacity of  people to maintain belief in an institution or a goal.

Right from the start of every military career, esprit de corps is taught to young recruits as an essential part of being in the military.  It is the “Glue” that keeps a unit together, ready for whatever challenge may arise.

Being posted to a warship I know how true this really is, for example, when a ship has a high morale  thing are good; the food is great, everybody is rested and feeling energized.. smiles.. jokes and high fives all around.  Nothing can stop us!

On the flip side, when the morale is low it can be like a jail with no escape.  People are upset, frustrated and even emotionally damaged.  You just don’t want to be there anymore, but you don’t really have a choice because you can’t just get off a ship in the middle of the ocean.

Interestingly enough, the Captain of the ship and how he treats the crew, is the sole reason for good or bad morale.

One With The Strength Of Many

Psychosocial Hazard?

 

  When we think of hazards at work, we generally think of physical hazards like: pinch points, nip points, trip hazards and guarding issues.

Psychosocial hazards are just as real as physical hazards at work, and in some cases, if not recognized and controlled they can have a very negative impact on your bottom line.

Many studies have been done on psychosocial hazards, and the impact on the workplace. Dr. Martin Shain and Health Canada have put out a recent study called Best Advice on Risk Management in the Workplace. It simply states that workers with a high demand for production and little or no control, and, or, high effort/low reward are at risk of being frustrated, angry, and stressed, which can contribute to aggressive behavior, sabotage, poor physical and mental health and a general lack of safety. These negative feelings can be multiplied two to three times if the employee perceives the employer as being unfair.

We can come up with many situations that exemplify this research, such as the example of a good marriage. When you ask two people who have been married for a long time “what helped them stay together”; they always say the same thing… “it is a relationship of give and take” which means the effort/reward system is good. On the other hand, ask a divorced couple to highlight the reasons why they got divorced and the answer is mostly…”I gave so much and got nothing in return”, Which means the effort/reward system has failed and so has their relationship.

Oddly enough, the marriage scenario is most like our workplaces. The relationship between employer/employee both have basic needs that have to be met to feel good about the working relationship.

Recognizing that psychosocial hazards exist is the first step in a process set up to control them, and controlling them can put you in Canada’s top 100 employers list where the effort/reward system is working; and it is the main reason why they are considered Top Employers!

How to Keep Workers Happy [Infographic]

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How to Keep Workers Happy [Infographic].

“The Right to Refuse”

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We here in Canada have some great laws that protect the worker’s safety, however,  they’re widely unknown and unused.

The most unused law is the right to refuse unsafe work.  It’s probably the most powerful and important “right” workers have, yet it goes unused.  Just think of all the deaths and accidents that could have been prevented if they had used that right.

Every person I hire starts their fist day with me.  We go through training videos, have a safety tour of the plant at which time I show them all the does and don’t s and what to watch for.  I also explain in detail the right to refuse unsafe work and I encourage them to use it.  By doing this I give them the knowledge and tools to stay safe and go home at the end of each shift.

 

5 Ways CEOs Can Keep Employees Happy | CEO.com

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5 Ways CEOs Can Keep Employees Happy | CEO.com.

5 tips for dealing with workplace anxiety

Ceridian - Transforming Human Capital Management

employee stressMore than a few human resources leaders out there are worried about employee retention and productivity. There are many reasons why, but chief among them is anxiety among the workforce. If employees are feeling overworked, abused or otherwise emotionally distraught, it can affect them both professionally and personally. In many cases, it will lead to them seeking work elsewhere.

HR Morning recently publicized this growing concern. The news source publicized some alarming survey data that shows the effects of workplace anxiety – in a recent Right Management poll, 83 percent of employees said they would be “looking to make a move” in 2014, and another 9 percent are busy networking because they’re “considering” finding something new. Of the 900-plus workers polled, only 5 percent were confident they would stay in their current positions.

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Motivational Quote George S. Patton

Forbes Says Happy Employees = Hefty Profits

http://www.forbes.com/sites/meghanbiro/2014/01/19/happy-employees-hefty-profits/.

Finding Sanity in an Insanely Busy World